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Aeranthes antennophora (Madagascar)

Discussion in 'Orchid Culture' started by CJWatson, Apr 11, 2012.

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  1. CJWatson

    CJWatson Member

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    Anybody growing this species? I got it last summer and have no idea if it is mature or not, I don't see any sign of previous bloom. The leaf span is about 32". Seems to be growing well, but there isn't much cultural information online about it.
    TIA
     
  2. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze Anglican Supporting Member

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    Can't help with your question, but welcome to the forum! Marni might know something about that plant.
     
  3. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    It's great to see you here! Xmprædicta told me about your wonderful way with angraecoids.

    I haven't grown this species myself but here is some information from the great new book Les Orchidées de Madagascar by Bosser and Lecoufle:

    Aëranthes antennophora: "Epiphyte in humid forests on branches covered by mosses and lichens, at about 1000m of altitude. Endemic [to Madagascar] Blooms in February"

    Aëranthes are capable of selfing, so someday when yours flowers perhaps you might set a pod on it :p
     
  4. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I have no knowledge of it, but I do have books I'll see what I can find. Scary to think that an aeranthes with a leaf span of 32" might not be mature!

    Hermanns et al says Mossy forest on moss and lichen covered trees. 1000 m. Epiphyte. The infloresence is normally shorter than the leaves. That book was already on the floor, I'll see what's on the bookshelf.
     
  5. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Hey, Jacob, you beat me! Stewart also says in is from the central highlands.
     
  6. T. migratoris

    T. migratoris Active Member

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    I have a good-sized plant in a 6" basket. It hasn't bloomed for me yet. I'm guessing the individual leaves are about 12-15" long so maybe this year? I grow it in a cooler, less bright corner of the GH with most of the other Aeranthes.
     
  7. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    Great to hear you are growing it too
     
  8. xmpraedicta

    xmpraedicta Prairie angraecoid nut Supporting Member

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    Can't wait to see photos of this one...also, welcome! Glad you made it :)
     
  9. CJWatson

    CJWatson Member

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    Robin, what medium are you using for your plant? Mine is still in the 4" pot it came in, with a mud mix like Oak Hill's for the medium. Time to repot since the medium is breaking down, but not sure what it needs. The leaves are 18" on the plant I have, 32" LS with the overlap. I think it is mature but ..... we'll find out, hopefully. The books say it blooms in Feb, but they don't say where -- in Madagascar, or in the northern hemisphere?

    I still have various Angs which haven't bloomed in the 6 or 7 years I have had them (most started as seedlings) so I don't have any guarantees, but if we both get lucky with this species, how about a pollen trade? :)
     
  10. theLab

    theLab Member Supporting Member

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    If there is an intention to set a pod onto an Aeranthes take note that these seeds are rather short-living and dislike to get frozen. So you ought to sow them as soon as possible.
     
  11. T. migratoris

    T. migratoris Active Member

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    I forgot what media it's in - I'll check in the morning. And a pollen trade is mandatory ... let's keep each other in the loop as buds appear.
     
  12. T. migratoris

    T. migratoris Active Member

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    Thank you. Your input, by the way, is incredibly valuable and is much appreciated. Documented experiences with sexual reproduction of Angraecoids are difficult to come by.
     
  13. theLab

    theLab Member Supporting Member

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    Tom, one learns by making mistakes only but it is not necessary that others do the same mistakes we did. :)
    A lot of seeds can be frozen, even among the Angraecoids - but some lose their viability very soon when stored that way. So the best storage of seeds is upon a suitable medium and this has to be done right in time.
     
  14. CJWatson

    CJWatson Member

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    Thank you for this info. If -- and that's a big IF -- I eventually get a pod on this plant, I will use due care in getting it to the flasking lab I use.
     
  15. CJWatson

    CJWatson Member

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    Oh wow! I took the plant over to the potting bench to repot, and found an 8" spike on it! I didn't notice it because it is as thin as a thread and looked like a skinny root.
     
  16. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    Wohoo!