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Cyrtorchis chailluana

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by xmpraedicta, Apr 10, 2021.

  1. xmpraedicta

    xmpraedicta Prairie angraecoid nut Supporting Member

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    Intensely evening fragrant and first time bloom for me after 2-3 years. Still nailing down what it needs, but absolutely in love with this one. Leaves spotty from being out in low air movement environment, and better now that they’re in the tank.

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  2. Arne

    Arne Active Member

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    Maybe it also needed to reach a critical size. I bought a seedling two years ago and I thought it was about to have its first blooms this spring. The buds didn’t develop further - probably still too young.
     
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  3. The Orchidomaniac

    The Orchidomaniac Active Member

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    I adore the curly petals and sepals!
    Looks sorta like a thin Angraecum.
     
  4. Sabinchen

    Sabinchen Well-Known Member

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    WOOOW very beautiful Orchid
     
  5. xmpraedicta

    xmpraedicta Prairie angraecoid nut Supporting Member

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    Blooming again. Not sure why fall this year.
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  6. DarleneJay

    DarleneJay Well-Known Member

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    Wonderful. I have tried this species a couple of times but have not been able to sustain it. Yours looks great. What is the potting media? I tried to grow mine mounted in the past.
     
  7. xmpraedicta

    xmpraedicta Prairie angraecoid nut Supporting Member

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    I have this potted in course orchiata. The roots are quite thick and seem to enjoy burrowing into the bark, with lots of root growth in the moister bottom of the pot. I've seen it growing in trees in photos, but I wonder if that's in very humid/rainy locations.
     
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  8. fishsqueezer

    fishsqueezer New Member

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    Wow xmpraedicta, the fall flowers on your Cyrtorchis plant are incredible! Gorgeous. I got this species last spring at the Spokane orchid society's spring show and sale, and I have struggled mightily with it. It got root rot, then scale. I finally have it mounted and it seems to be doing better, but of course just in time for winter dormancy. Do you think my plant is large enough to possibly bloom in the spring? And do you have any care tips or advice for me as a beginner with this species?
    [​IMG]
     
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  9. Arne

    Arne Active Member

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    If you just consider the green part of the plant, it is definitely big enough to bloom. But it must grow a functioning root system first and the roots must be allowed to attach to the bark. Right now I would have done anything possible to make the plants grow new roots. You can try treatment with Kelpak (First Rays) for instance. Also, while the roots are attaching, make sure the plant is completely immobile on the bark surface.

    My plant started to bloom when it was much smaller than that but it had more active roots.
     
  10. xmpraedicta

    xmpraedicta Prairie angraecoid nut Supporting Member

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    Now that it's winter, it will be a bit challenging to get it established. I find this species enjoys a cooler winter rest. In my observations, many of these thick rooted higher elevation orchids, winter is characterized by drier conditions, but enough evening humidity in the form of fog to keep the plants from getting too desiccated. In the absence of roots, this will be particularly challenging, as the amount of velamen you have to absorb moisture will be limited.

    You can try to artificially shorten the winter season, by inducing a new cycle of growth early, with artificial lights, and higher temperatures as well as moisture. It's a bit of a risky maneuver, however, because if you don't get it right and the plant isn't ready, it will rot. Alternatively, you can try your best to keep it from completely desiccating this winter, until it's ready to wake up in the spring. High humidity, particularly in the evening, combined with good air movement such that condensation doesn't remain on the leaves is important.

    Good luck! It's a wonderful species.
     
  11. fishsqueezer

    fishsqueezer New Member

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    Huh, I just looked up Kelpak, that's interesting.

    Each branch of the plant has one thick root that has firmly anchored itself into a crevice of the bark mount that I am using (the one on the left is hidden). They were just stubs when I originally mounted it and they've each grown a couple inches in the meantime. You are obviously right that the roots overall are very under-developed, which is a consequence of the overwatering and root rot conditions that I created this summer. But believe me when I say that it is doing much better!

    I actually am keeping it in an IKEA greenhouse cabinet with very high humidity and air circulation and even just a couple of inches of roots have been enough to keep the leaves hydrated. So I think it will make it through the winter dormancy just fine and will certainly grow a lot more next year. I'm just wistfully imagining what it would look like it I had given it the attention it deserved sooner. Oh well - live and learn. Thank you for your insights.
     
  12. fishsqueezer

    fishsqueezer New Member

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    Interesting - okay, well, down in my basement I have a corner cabinet where I keep a very nice specimen of Monstera obliqua and a couple other aroids. It's cooler down there and the cabinet has a humidity controller on it that alternately runs a fogger or a fan to maintain 94% humidity (M. obliqua is a drama queen). I could move it down there for the winter and water it less.

    I'm not really interesting in taking a risky approach, I don't want to force a bloom. I'd rather wait until the plant is large and healthy enough to flower naturally, I was more just curious if you thought it might bloom this spring now that it is healthy (although with sparse roots) since you clearly have a lot of experience with this species. Thankfully the two very short, fat roots that it does have are thoroughly burrowed into the bark and are doing an adequate job of keeping the plant hydrated, so I'm not worried about it drying out over the winter. I'll just keep my fingers crossed and we'll see what happens! Maybe if it doesn't bloom this spring but does great over the summer I might get a fall bloom like you did. I appreciate your time, best wishes.