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Deciduous and dry rest dendrobiums

Discussion in 'Orchid Culture' started by Jon, Feb 3, 2009.

  1. Forrest

    Forrest Really Neat

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    Angs arent orchids.

    Well, maybe they are, but they should be classified out. Like slippers.


    just mesin' MB.
     
  2. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze Anglican Supporting Member

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    "What makes you think that root growth necessarily indicates the beginning of the rainy season or the need for increased water?"

    I don't think that's what I said...what I meant was that the root growth indicates that watering should not stop or that the rainy season continues, not that watering should increase. Most of my root-lore comes from an Austrian Ang grower but I've also read things in the old AOS bulletins to the same effect. Which is basically, if the root tips are growing, you can and should water copiously and often. When they're covered in velamen, they are resting and the plant does not want water but wants high humidity to keep from dessicating. I can't keep the humidity high enough in general and try to compensate by watering more...which is sometimes counter productive. :bang:
     
  3. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I don't agree that root growth indicates that watering should not stop. It may be the case, but there are plenty of examples where watering with new root growth will kill the plant or interrupt the plant's cycles. Just as flowering doesn't necessarily indicate the need to water.

    I think it was Tom who suggested that easing the plant into a dry rest. Less nitrogen and less water will harden off a plant and reduce growth and I agree. A phrase I love is: Who's in charge here? Plants don't get the chance to tell nature what season it is, they respond to it. Early on, I spent several years trying to get a Rossioglossum insleayi on schedule by waiting for growth to stop to give it a dry rest. Didn't work so well. I finally just said "Screw it" it's winter now. It adjusted just fine.

    A generalization that is worth considering is that in winter in seasonal habitat, the humidity during the day is lower than in the rainy season, but it cools off and dew provides extra moisture. Light misting in the morning, which simulates a heavy dew, would be my choice. If the plants are suffering or dessicated, re-examine what you are doing.

    But if your plants are doing well and you are happy with the results you have been getting, don't change anything.
     
  4. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze Anglican Supporting Member

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    That is an excellent post, full of wisdom. Many thanks for that.
    Yes, Tom has been trying to get me to change my ways on (over)watering for a couple years now I think. :D

    I did try much harder to decrease fert and watering this past Fall than I ever have before and I think I essentially did. Plus since I grow in the house, the heater being on sort of forces a drier winter no matter what I do. I dunno...maybe i just have too many Hoosier seedlings that are still too young to bloom. And I should probably stop trying to grow thin-rooted and leaved Aeranthes and Aerangis next to pencil-rooted Angraecums and leathery leaved Jumelleas. *sigh* c'est la vie dans la Sangtuary ©
     
  5. Tom-DE

    Tom-DE Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    What is your problem with slippers? Where is Candace now?:evil: