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Dendrobium parvulum (syn delicatulum)

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by Marni, Apr 20, 2014.

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  1. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Seeing this in bloom is still an "event" for me. The upside of waging war on the bush snails is good roots. The downside is white residue that doesn't wash off easily. I'll take the trade off.

    d.parvulum.0742.2flr.close.jpg
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    d.parvulum.0742.pot.jpg
     
  2. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    My heart went pitter-patter. Gorgeous plant and flower. I have an unbloomed plant that I hope has a nice color. How much light are you giving this?
     
  3. Boytjie

    Boytjie Out hiking Supporting Member

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    Also curious about light levels, and also your growing temps. I've got a mounted one that is growing very well, and I'm wondering if I need to do anything different to coax blooms. -Stephen
     
  4. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    I also want to know! I've got mine mounted growing next to my subuliferum. Didn't seem to like cool temps and defoliated.
     
  5. Boytjie

    Boytjie Out hiking Supporting Member

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    Ha, I had the same/opposite problem: subuliferum didn't like the warm temps for the parvulum. Also defoliated. o_O
     
  6. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    Haha, last year I decidedly made the conclusion my ugly foliage and sparse flowering of subuliferum was due to it being cold. Moved it 3 meters towards the warmer end and they responded lovely!
     
  7. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I have D parvulum in 3 climate areas. This is in the 50F, bright light spot. Next to cuthbertsonii. Another is on the heat mat with 70F bottom heat, but not in really bright light. A couple of others are at 56F night in moderate light. They all grow well, but this is the only one to bloom right now. It was a large plant when I bought it from Tom Perlite last summer and he was growing it cool so I decided to stay with that. I will be moving the others to brighter light. I always thought it was a warm grower, but I have proven myself wrong again and again.
     
    Jgrimm1055 likes this.
  8. Tom-DE

    Tom-DE Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    It looks fantastic! Congrats!
    Anyone knows the diff between delicatulum and parvulum? Recently I received a parvulum(originally from Andy P's listing) and the growths and leaves are almost 2-3X bigger than my delicatulum(from Tom P). Years ago, I had another delicatulum and its growth was the same size like the one I have now.

    I grow my delicatulum I/C, bright light /light shade. It grows very well but no flowers.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2014
  9. chicago chad

    chicago chad Active Member

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    It looks like we are all on the same page except for Marni b/c she can bloom the damn thing. Is there anything that can be said for more success growing it horizontally versus vertically? What are you fertilizing it with and at what ratio?
     
  10. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    Marni, those are night minima right? Mine is vertically mounted nights around 55° days 80°F bright light. Liberally fertilized, always with a RO flush proceeding that. Mine too was from Tom's. If I recall it was an imported one from Japan, I can't be too sure because when I got it I had suffered a traumatic brain injury a couple weeks earlier.
     
  11. wpinnix

    wpinnix William Pinnix

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    Awesome plant. Does anyone know of a source for this species in the US?
     
  12. Boytjie

    Boytjie Out hiking Supporting Member

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    I got mine from Andy's maybe 1.5 years ago. It's not on his website, but with Andy it's always best to call and ask anyway. It wasn't cheap, and he didn't have many of them. Good luck.
     
  13. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Yes, Daniel, those are average minimum, I'm generally not too concerned about daytime temperatures. I fertilize at every watering (RO water) with 1/4 tsp per gallon of MSU for RO and don't flush before or after. I don't remember where Tom's were from.

    I just did a quick look and found a reference of it growing on a tree trunk in situ, so it may not be particular about orientation. I have always seen it growing horizontally in collections.
     
  14. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It is my understanding that they are now considered synonyms and that parvulum takes precedents.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2014
  15. Jeff9

    Jeff9 Member

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    Wonderfully grown Marni!!

    I have a pink and blue clone which are both producing alot of foliage, yet, very little roots so far.
    Did you notice any increase or decrease of root production when you changed the temperature?

    I heard they have been found on (mossy) rocks too and i doubt orientation matters much. I grow mine horizontal too.
     
  16. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Jeff, I haven't changed the growing temps on these, I have multiple clones in different places. And this one was growing the brightest. I may try one of the others cooler, but haven't yet.
     
  17. Tom-DE

    Tom-DE Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Hi Marni, That is correct according to Kew. but do you see any differences among all your clones in terms of growth? Those few Den.delicatulum I have seen/grown are significantly smaller than the one(labeled as Den. parvulum) I received a week ago, and I was told this Den. parvulum came from Andy's Orchids. Just curious...
     
  18. Tom-DE

    Tom-DE Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Jeff, I used to grow mine on horizontal mount(cork) then I just hanged it up and grow it vertical and a bit more light. I don't think my plant cares much about the position of the mount...it does have lots of roots.
    Sorry for the hijack again.
     
  19. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Not a hijack at all, Tom. I haven't bloomed enough to make any observations. I also doubt that the people putting the names on the labels have any particular basis in most cases for what they put on the label. André Schuiteman's book "A Guide to Dendrobium of New Guinea" does not have an entry for Den delicatulum nor huliorum, only D parvulum. He also doesn't give synonyms so it is of limited use in that sense. He describes the flowers as bluish violet or pinkish purple, sometimes whitish. He also gives the elevation as 600-2650 meters.
     
  20. Jeff9

    Jeff9 Member

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    Thanks for clarifying Marni.

    According to the "oxyglossum book" the species name is D. delicatulum. As for the subspecies: subsp. parvulum is distinguished from subsp. delicatulum by it's significantly larger flowers (more than 1.2cm long). Though, they mention that the differences may not be great enough to keep the two subspecies apart. Red is mentioned as possible flower color too.

    We could use some updated literature. I have seen photos of oxyglossums surface online which have color or foliage variations that aren't described yet, new undescribed oxyglossum species are showing up that are not in the book or anywhere else.

    Tom: I agree, and in the wild they probably ramble over many types of terrain, both vertical and horizontal.

    We got four tiny pieces of supposedly pink delicatulum the last year here, two survived, i don't know if they are seperate clones. I think they will start to pick up the pace once they reach a certain size.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014