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Dendrophylax funalis

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by Uluwehi, Feb 18, 2011.

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  1. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    This enchanting, leafless, angraecoid orchid species is endemic to Jamaica. Some may not find its scent so beguiling, however (the scent from this clone is decidedly spermatic). I used to have a quite different clone that had a longer inflorescence, a much longer, forward-curving spur, very pale green petals and sepals, non-recurvant lateral sepals and a pleasant, jasmine-like fragrance.

    I will get some more pictures outdoors on the next sunny day. I took these under a metal halide light.

    I grow this unattached and suspended under HID lights, warm [34°C max, 18°C min (93°F, 65°F)], very bright (average exposure is 5000fc), decent air movement and quite humid (85%+ rh). It gets watered twice daily in the summer and once daily in the winter. This species has a tendency to reproduce asexually by producing keiki at the end of modified peduncles.

    Fun fact: Keiki is a Hawaiian word than means child, offspring or youngster. The Hawaiian language (ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi) is an endangered language but keiki is one of the few Hawaiian words that everyone in Hawai'i understands and uses. I'm sure most here on OI know that orchid growers in Hawai'i and on the US Mainland have adopted the word and given it a more specific meaning, referring generally only to aerial plantlets produced along a pseudobulb or peduncle. In Hawai'i, keiki is pronounced "kay-kee". Somehow the pronunciation evolved into something new on the Mainland where I usually hear folks pronounce it as "kee-kee". Like all Hawaiian words, keiki doesn't need an "s" on the end of the word to pluralise it (when speaking ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi, the modifier precedes the noun that is to be pluralised, e.g. nā keiki). This also got lost in translation as one will often hear "keikis" (pronounced "kee-kees") used among Mainland orchid folk. The same goes for other Hawaiian loan words muumuu/muumuus (mu'umu'u), lei/leis, luau/luaus, etc. in American English.
    5455003513_61c9d1e7d8_z.jpg 5455617180_cdb8eb189b_z.jpg
     
  2. gg68

    gg68 Angraecoid addict

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    I love it!!:D:clap::clap:
     
  3. Alexis

    Alexis New Member

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    Nice! When you mentioned in your grow chamber thread about this one blooming for you, I ran out and checked mine. It usually blooms in May, but I thought maybe... Not only is it not even spiking, it was COVERED in scale. Who knew these were scale magnets? Nothing else around it showed any problems. So thanks for (inadvertently) alerting me to the problem. ;-)
     
  4. Kitty

    Kitty AKA\Debby

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    that is a great flower! these rare plants have found a good home with you!
     
  5. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    And thanks for the "nā keiki" info. It is fun.
     
  6. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    Mahalo kākou! (thanks to all of you)

    Alexis, sorry to hear about the scale! Hope you zapped them with something good.

    Marni, I'm glad you found my linguistic detour worthwhile ;)
     
  7. prem

    prem Wild Orchid Enthusiast

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    Very cool!

    ---Prem