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Fungi on Tuberolabium rhophalorrhachis

Discussion in 'Issues, Disease and Pests' started by Nisanisa, Mar 27, 2019.

  1. Nisanisa

    Nisanisa Well-Known Member

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    I noticed there are fungi grow on my Tuberolabium rophalorrhachis. It is white and turn reddish after a few days. The fungi is hard and attached strongly to the stem. No other orchids around are infected though. So far, the plant looks okay. I wonder whether this fungi is a threat for the plant, and how to deal with it. I hope somebody will help me. Thank you
     

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  2. Ray

    Ray Orchid Iconoclast Supporting Member

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    I could be wrong, but the morphology makes me think "slime mold". When I see them in flower beds, I just use cinnamon to eradicate them, but that's probably not a good thing to broadly spread on the root system of the plant.

    You might try using some sort of small tool to place a small amount on the mold alone and see its reaction.
     
  3. Nisanisa

    Nisanisa Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for replying Ray
    Is slime mold slimy? These fungi are not slimy, they are velvety.
    But, I am going tobtry cinnamon tomorrow morning.
     
  4. Ray

    Ray Orchid Iconoclast Supporting Member

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    No, I think they get that name because of the way they seem to creep over areas.
     
  5. Nisanisa

    Nisanisa Well-Known Member

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    I'd like to update what happen to my Tuberolabium rhophalorrhachis.
    I have been tried cinnamon as what Ray suggested. I don't have any cinnamon powder at home, but I grow some cinnamon tree in my backyard. So I decided to give it a try.
    I soaked some cinnamon leaves over night and then rubbed the liquid using cotton swab to the fungi.
    After three days application I noticed that the fungi remain attached strongly. But they getting dried, and no longer fluffy and velvety.
    And there is no further growth.
     
  6. DanaRaluca

    DanaRaluca Active Member

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    :) Thank you for the update, Nisa.
    I am glad things are getting better
     
  7. Nisanisa

    Nisanisa Well-Known Member

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    You are welcome Dana. Still can't get rid the fungi off yet. Now, I am soaking some cinnamon bark. They have stronger aroma compared to the leaves. Guess the effect will be stronger too
     
  8. Ray

    Ray Orchid Iconoclast Supporting Member

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    The extract from bark is cinnamaldehyde. That from leaves is eugenol. Both are pretty good fungicides and bactericides, but it's hard to say which will be more effective in your "teas".

    I make tea from cinnamon bark powder sold as a spice, but purchase pure Sri Lankan cinnamon leaf oil (cinnamonvogue.com), as when diluted a few percent in alcohol, it is far more effective. I have even used it (undiluted) to eradicate toenail fungus, which amazed both my family doctor and my dermatologist.
     
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  9. Nisanisa

    Nisanisa Well-Known Member

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    Still can't get rid off the fungi. The fungi are getting dried now, and the colour turn to pale red. I've just carefully cut some of them using a sharp and thin cutter. Try too peel it off. It is hard and have grown quite thick, around 0,5 mm. I don't think that they disturb the plant growth. New roots and new leaves grow normally. But, there is a very small chance the plant will produce flowers. As the mold block the place where the inflorescences grow.

    By the way, I've just noticed, there is different kind of fungi on my polystachya mount. It is a coffee branch. It has different colour and characteristics. It is white, and spread widely on the wood and some cover the plant's roots. I can peel them easily.
    I think rainy season give them a good condition to grow. These last three days we have no rain, and make the fungi dry.