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Larger Vanda Basket

Discussion in 'Orchid Culture' started by DPfarr, Jul 5, 2015.

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  1. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    I have a Bulbophyllum phalaenopsis in a 12" octagonal basket. The bulbs are to the edge and it's putting out new growth. I can't find anything aesthetically pleasing to put it in.

    If you had suggestions, I'd be happy to check it out.
     
    John Marvin (Joe Jo) likes this.
  2. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Wow, wish I had that problem. I'm assuming the basket is hanging vertically (with the "top" to the side) to allow the leaves to hang down? Interesting dilemma. I'll give it some thought.

    BTW, I would love to see a photo of that plant.
     
  3. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    Here you go Kelly.
     

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  4. Mandy2705

    Mandy2705 Member

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    How long have you been growing that? It's jaw dropping amazing!
     
  5. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the photo. That is beautiful.
    Have you considered building your own basket for it? Some rot-resistant wood, saw, drill and galvanized wire and a little time. Shouldn't be too hard to make.
     
  6. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    What's a rot resistant wood?
     
  7. Ray

    Ray Orchid Iconoclast Supporting Member

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    That was going to be my suggestion, as well, Kelly. It's really not all that difficult. I have a large cattleya in a 18" basket I made from a piece of cedar, and it seems to be hanging in there quite well.

    If you want something REALLY stable, look for some "recycled plastic lumber" made from recycled PETE bottles. I've made several baskets from that. it cuts like a hot knife through butter, never decomposes, is stable to all agricultural chemicals, and the plants do just great in it.
     
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  8. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Easily available would be cedar (not very strong and splits easily but very easy to work), redwood (need to use heart wood. The white-pink sap wood will quickly rot), white oak (what whiskey and wine casks are made from. NOT red oak). More expensive but probably the best would be teak, mahogany and ipe.
    I have wanted to try the synthetic materials that Ray talked about but haven't yet. Good to hear that it works well, too. That material would never rot.
     
  9. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys. Ray, did you just get like one of those polymer deck planks and then cut it into appropriate pieces?
     
  10. Ray

    Ray Orchid Iconoclast Supporting Member

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    I have not looked into the decking materials. I used what they called "recycled lumber", like the stuff I've seen used to make park benches. It is solid throughout, as opposed to a dense surface and porous interior I've seen in polymeric trim boards.
     
  11. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Daniel, I replaced my old deck with Azek decking which is a solid PVC. Completely non-porous. Azek is not at the big box stores but is carried by real lumber yards. I plan to make a small basket out of it as a trial. If I try it before you do I'll let you know how it works.
    There is Trex decking available at big box stores. Trex is a blend of sawdust and some kind of plastic. It is slightly porous because it will stain.
    Ray, where did you get your recycled material?
     
  12. Ray

    Ray Orchid Iconoclast Supporting Member

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    plasticlumberyard.com

    I avoided Azek trim boards, as the interior is not as dense as the surface - I have some leftover from a room addition, and the interior grows algae.
     
  13. John Marvin (Joe Jo)

    John Marvin (Joe Jo) Member

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    That is one gigantic plant, amazing! How about one of those plastic delivery crates that vendors use to supply stores with milk, eggs and other stuff, you can find them at any 7-11 or other pantry stores for free.
     
  14. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    I don't particularly want my plant growing in an Acme Diary Co crate. I did think about it though. I really love this plant and want it to look its best.

    I was just thinking of a bag type basket. A polymer type weave with the consistency of burlap so that it can breathe and roots can grow into or out of should it choose.

    A funny bit about this plant. You can see the smaller 6" basket inside, one of the growths grew through a wire loop. The bulb developed fine and the rhizome between bulbs (I think) is what in inside the wire loop. Inextricably linked to its first home.
     
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  15. John Marvin (Joe Jo)

    John Marvin (Joe Jo) Member

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    Yes I understand about the plant looking it's best. And yes orchids will do some strange and unexpected things sometimes, that is why I love to grow them, they are always showing me something new.
     
  16. AnonYMouse

    AnonYMouse aka Ree, the not-so-stealthy lurker

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    I mostly lurk but I had a couple of cents to spend.

    You can disassemble a couple of large teak baskets and reassemble the parts into one larger basket. Staple wire mesh for the back.

    I've seen some attractive (rather, not too ugly) grow bags, that might work.
     
    Marni likes this.
  17. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    I'm committing to building my own wooden basket of white oak. A polygon basket wouldn't be difficult. However, I would love to make a circular basket. I just don't know how to make 30-40 consistent arcs. If I made a 18" diameter, and divided the circumference into 10 arcs (~5.65") and did an alternated stack of 3 or four pieces.
     
  18. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Technically the circular basket shouldn't be any more difficult, just tedious making all of the curved pieces vs. quick and easy rectangles. Don't forget your overlap. The 5.65" circumference segment will turn into 6.65" +/- arc of wood.
     
  19. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    I don't know how to cut them, or what use. A router with some sort 9" length it can pivot off of?
     
  20. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Here is what I would do:
    Make a simple compass with a piece of string, shoelace, etc. Tie a pencil to one end of the string, adjust the length of the string to the appropriate length and pin it to a piece of cardboard. Holding the pencil vertical draw your arc on the cardboard. Adjust the string length for the inside arc and do it again. If you are doing 10 segments to complete the circle then that is a 36 degree angle from your compass center point to determine where the hole will be drilled for attachment to the adjacent piece. For something this large you will want your piece to extend 1/2 to 3/4 inch beyond the holes. Once you have this all sketched out on your cardboard, cut it out and you have a template to use.
    Unless you have access to some fancy replicating tools you will trace the shape on a piece of wood and cut it out with a bandsaw or scroll saw. Drill your holes at the appropriate spots. Repeat 39 more times.

    Making the cardboard template shouldn't take but 10 minutes. Making 40 of the curved pieces would be incredibly tedious and time consuming which is why you will not see them mass produced. Making a large polygon such as an octagon or decagon, using straight pieces, would take 1/10th the time.

    Good luck