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orchid society talk pest help please

Discussion in 'Issues, Disease and Pests' started by This_guy_Bri, Feb 1, 2009.

  1. This_guy_Bri

    This_guy_Bri weirdo

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    hi. i'm working on a presentation for my orchid society and a neighboring society about pests and i was just hopin' people could mention the types of pests they encounter so that i can make sure i haven't forgotten anything. i'm also planning on covering some common pesticides (as well as pesticide safety). Please mention what sorts of pesticides you are using.
    also, if you happen to have any photos of pests, disease, virus or beneficial insects that you wouldn't mind if i used, i'd appreciate it...
    i'm going to include:
    scale (soft, armored)
    mealybugs (long-tailed, citrus and some other)
    aphids
    mites
    slugs/snails
    thrips

    Please pm or email me if you prefer.
    thanks,
    Brian
     
  2. Clark

    Clark Gator Member

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    I had a grasshopper get in the greenhouse and he ate a lot of leaf material before I found him and squished him.
     
  3. Candace

    Candace Kept Woman Supporting Member

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    Don't forget rats, mice and chipmunks. I have more problems with rats and mice than any other critters.
     
  4. Jon

    Jon Mmmm... bulbophyllum...

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    Here are some mite pics. I used Avid to get rid of them. I also bumped up the RH. Mites prefer dry environs, so I think that helped rid my grow area also.

    They aren't very good images, but mites are small little effers.
    mitePic1.jpg mitePic2.jpg mitePic3.jpg
     
  5. Jon

    Jon Mmmm... bulbophyllum...

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    Here are some praying mantis pics. These things are awesome, and they're beneficial.
    mantis071807a.jpg mantis071807b.jpg mantis071807c.jpg mantis071807d.jpg
     
  6. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I would add moss, opossums, boisduval scale, centipedes or milipedes (which ever is the destructive one).

    Hummingbirds coming in and pollinating things without leaving notes about the pollen parent.

    Algae and that weird white mold like formation on my grapevine mounts. Snow mold. Earwigs and sow bugs.

    I'm just getting started.

    And don't forget false spider mite.
     
  7. Dale

    Dale New Member

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    Ferns, begonias, and oxalis. Not that I have any of that, of course.
     
  8. T. migratoris

    T. migratoris Active Member

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    I guess I'm lucky to have issues with only a couple of pests. Here's how I nuke 'em:

    scale: After wiping off those that are accessible, I spray with 70% isopropyl alcohol & follow with an Orthene 97 (1.5 tsp/gal) chaser a week or so later. I used to battle a lot with scale but now that I use Orthene I haven't seen one in quite a while.
    mealybugs: Orthene's ok but Merit 75 WP (0.25 tsp/gal) stopped 'em dead. Never had a recurrence after using Merit.
    aphids: never had a problem
    mites: Oh boy. I'm in inland California & I always seem to be dealing with mites. I'd venture to guess that at least 25% of the plants I get from nurseries in California come with mites. I used to get charged up about it but now I chalk it up to the dry climate & focus instead on control. I say control because I'm not sure eradication is feasible. Anyway, whenever I buy plants I now assume mites & other wildlife are in there so I hit 'em with a tank-mixed cocktail of Orthene 97 (1 tsp/gal) + Avid (2.5 ml/gal) + Tetrasan 5 WDG (0.75 tsp/gal). Avid's a miticide, Tetrasan's an ovicide, and Orthene gets the other stuff. I spray once a week for three weeks & quarrantine the plants for three weeks before introducing to the rest of the pack. This really seems to do the trick.
    slugs/snails: never really had much of a problem - saw a few once but they seem to have left (or died) on their own.
    thrips: no issue here either.

    I use Cleary's 3336F (3.5 ml/gal) to deal with fungus-related problems and it seems to do a pretty good job overall. I frankly don't use it much.

    Disclaimer: some of the concentrations I use for these pesticides came from trial & error or from recommendations based the experience of others. I've found that the concentrations listed on some of the labels only work for me at or near the upper end of the recommended dosage range.
     
  9. Vincent

    Vincent New Member

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    Leafhoppers. I don't know if they're worth mentioning because they don't seem to be known as a common orchid pest. I've encountered a few in San Antonio attacking the softer tissues of Cattleyas - new leads and buds. In one case, buds and flowers were deformed as a redult and there was some color break in the flowers. Maybe it was just mechanical damage, but leafhoppers can also transmit diseases.

    According to some info I found on the “Leafhopper Homepage:”

    Leafhoppers injure plants either directly, through feeding which can damage plant tissue and rob the plant of essential nutrients, or indirectly, through the transmission of plant pathogens such as viruses, mycoplasma-like organisms, or other microorganisms.

    Leafhoppers are one of the largest families of plant-feeding insects. There are more leafhopper species worldwide than all species of birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians combined. Leafhoppers feed by sucking the sap of vascular plants, and are found almost anywhere such plants occur, from tropical rainforests, to arctic tundra. Several leafhopper species are important agricultural pests.
     
  10. This_guy_Bri

    This_guy_Bri weirdo

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    thanks!

    anyone have any shots of thrips or bacterial or fungal rot? heck, any fungal or bacterial issues would be great.
    do people have any issues with whitefly?
    thanks again.
     
  11. kellygreen

    kellygreen Needs an Intervention

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    Most of these pics I delete, but here's one - bacterial rot on a floof. It died quickly after this. :mad:

    rotten pbulb.jpg
    rotten pbulb.jpg