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Psygmorchis pusilla

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by Alexey, May 3, 2012.

  1. Alexey

    Alexey Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Psygmorchis pusilla, aka Erycina pusilla, aka Oncidium pusillum, grown in warm orchidarium under rather bright light. This miniature orchid has "huge" flowers. My plant is still young. Hope to have it in better shape later, with multiple spikes. One of the concerns: some sources characterize this species as short living in cultivation. Any personal observations, recommendations?
    Erycina pusilla 01.jpg Erycina pusilla 02.jpg Erycina pusilla 03.jpg
     
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  2. JonP

    JonP all that Supporting Member

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    I can attest to the short-lived description. It seemed to bloom itself to death. I will try it again as it is an impressive plant to flower size ratio.
     
  3. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I too have heard that it is a short-lived species. However, I visited Señor Archilla of Cobán, Guatemala who showed me a many-growth plant that he had had for over 15 years. So I guess it all depends...
     
  4. Alexey

    Alexey Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Sounds challenging, but challenge - is why many of us into this hobby.
     
  5. ezil

    ezil Member

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    How would one prevent this plant from blooming itself to death? I've only had mine for 2 1/2 months, and it's only now acclimatized. I'd like to grow it into a specimen plant - does that mean I have to cut off the flower spikes as they form? (that's not what I want to do)
     
  6. Boytjie

    Boytjie Out hiking Supporting Member

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    Mine bloomed well and reliably with multiple spikes for the three years I had it. Almost effortless culture. Then, over the course of one month, it simply turned brown, dropped all its leaves, and that was that. So, I'd back up the claims of it being short-lived. Certainly wouldn't prevent me from getting another one. -Stephen
     
  7. Interdependence

    Interdependence Member

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    Sorry to hijack this thread, but where could one purchase this species? It's been on my list for quite some time. Love the photos! Thanks for sharing.
     
  8. Ricardo

    Ricardo Slave of demanding bird

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    I saw similar plants growing on a tree over a stream in Mindo, Ecuador. The tree had dozens of plants that looked like this one, although the flowers were somewhat different. All the plants were fairly small, and all were growing in the outermost twigs of the tree. I didn't see a large multi-growth plant anywhere in the tree. I would suspect that they are short lived in the wild.
     
  9. Alexey

    Alexey Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Interdependence: I acquired it from Ten Shin. However, it worth to check vendors from Central America from where Psygmorchis pusilla originates.
     
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  10. theLab

    theLab Member Supporting Member

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    Accidentally I got a report a few days ago maybe proving that Psygmorchis in culture suffers from a lack of her mykorrhiza-fungus. We just obtained a flask from the Netherlands which shall be infected with a certain fungus still in-vitro now and then after this infection has taken place the seedlings will be deflasked and normally cultivated. As for the fungus we are going to take one which is able to germinate Psygmorchis pusilla symbiotically. Seen from the evolutionary point of view it really has no use that a plant-species dies after a certain period without serving as nutriant-donator to its keikis at least. Orchids don´t belong to the annual or bi-annual plants. So why are some genus or species so tricky in their (artificial) cultivation?

    Another report fell into my hands recently and I don´t know where to post it else. It is about the self-pollination (autogamy) and I mentioned days ago that some Angraecoids refuse accepting their own pollinia. A mistake we´ve maybe always made was we self-pollinated them ... too early. There should be (at least for other plant-families) an emergency-way if it lacks on the natural pollinator that the scar accepts its own pollen when the flower is just a little bit ahead of fading. Indeed, this we have never tried. We always referred the optimal time of pollinating a plant to a foreign - or cross-pollination but never regarded that a self-pollination either happens very, very soon (sometimes still in the stage of the bud) or extraordinary late. Anyway, I don´t know where to post it else so mention it here.
     
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  11. Alexey

    Alexey Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Thanks theLab for giving new approach with mykorrhiza-fungus. Why not to try, if it gives some hope and if it is harmless? What about Trichoderma harzianum, strain T-22? Looks like it is possible to find is in Canada as RootShield brand and there was some positive effect (at least for new roots initiation) on orchids, shown with similar UK product on one of the forums.
     
  12. theLab

    theLab Member Supporting Member

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    @Alexey, Trichoderma doesn´t germinate epiphytes as far kown. Sure it has only be tested at some species and not at all. The mykorrhiza we get sent is still unknown to us in its identity, we only will obtain a tube with a code and we only have the task to infect the medium with it in our lab. But if it works well I am convinced it will be pulished. I think everywhere pusilla is known as a short-living plant. Does this refer only to this species or among the entire genus?
     
  13. Alexey

    Alexey Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    theLab: what about results provided in thread “Importing Plants: The effect of Trychoderma on root development” (OB forum => Advanced discussion)? Accidental effect caused by other factors, non-related to Trichoderma?
     
  14. theLab

    theLab Member Supporting Member

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    Indeed, Trichoderma seems to support the development of roots. This is interesting and is for sure the beginning of some intensive investigations. But Trichoderma has no effect in the germination of orchid-seeds, at least not on these it has been tested on (terrestrials, hardy and tropical ones, tropic epiphytes). No germination takes place, this doesn´t reduce the effect this fungus seems to show on any root-development although it´s certainly an accidental side-effect as Trichoderma is a terrstrial fungus and doesn´t start a symbiosis with an orchid itself, at least not with epiphytes. This is the reason why Trichoderma has to be added constantly whereas there would be no use to offer it regularly when the orchid and the fungus live in a kind of symbiosis.
     
  15. Boytjie

    Boytjie Out hiking Supporting Member

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    Oak Hill Gardens frequently carries it, and also check eBay. I often see it for auction there by various vendors. -Stephen
     
  16. Sharlon

    Sharlon New Member

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    Go to EBay or Amazon I just bought recently on EBay $20.00 + $6.97 s&h.
     
  17. Sharlon

    Sharlon New Member

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    Thanks for your information.
     
  18. Ray

    Ray Orchid Iconoclast Supporting Member

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    Interestingly enough, it seems that many species of bacteria and fungi secrete indole acetic acid, which is stimulates root growth. Unfortunately, a single inoculation is of limited value, as the populations are not particularly stable in our culture.

    The multiple species in the Inocucor product also produce IAA, and the multitude of species probably extend the viability, if only statistically, but even that should be reinforced monthly.

    From my reading, the natural mycorrhizae are VERY specific in their relationships with orchids, and we basically have none of them in captivity, but when you consider the positive impact commercial products like Inocucor have upon the survival of difficult species ex-flask, I think it would be worth a try with psygmorchis.
     
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