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stains on the leaves - what i do wrong with my Phalaenopsis ?

Discussion in 'Issues, Disease and Pests' started by Wojtek, Feb 13, 2021.

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  1. Wojtek

    Wojtek New Member

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    Hi,

    I'm quite a beginner with orchids. Basically I just put into my plant window some orchids people gave me as a gifts. My plant window was designed for plants that Like about 90% humidity. I'm worried got this is too much for Phalaenopsis.

    could you have a look and confirm this? I think this is the reason of the stains on the leaves. What should I do with them? cut the affected leaves?

    I'm also worried that I have infestation with spider mites.



    [​IMG]

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    Humidity and temperature.

    [​IMG]


    Could You help me?

    Best,
    Wojtek
     

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  2. Ray

    Ray Orchid Iconoclast Supporting Member

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    Humidity is certainly not a problem for phalaenopsis. but bright light is. What you have in that first leaf close-up is a classic case of sunburn. The damage is done and there is nothing you can do, so just leave it alone and that leaf will eventually be dropped by the plant. Phalaenopsis like deep shade, warmth and high humidity.

    The pattern on that second leaf image appears to be depressions, likely due to a lack of water.

    I see you have it growing with ivy, which makes me think, in soil. Orchids like that are epiphytes that, in nature, live attached to the bark of a tree, with their roots spread widely over the surface, and never down into soil.

    They need an open, air medium so their root systems can "breathe" (they do a significant amount of gas exchange through their roots), but that provides a uniform degree of moisture.
     
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  3. Wojtek

    Wojtek New Member

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    Thank You!


    There is no soil. The entire cabinet is hydroponic. I measured TDS in the water tank today and it is 35 ppm. (rather extreme) According to the same TDS meter water out of my reverse osmosis has 20 ppm's. Surface under the Phalaenopsis it is vertical polypropylene felt (2x5mm) . Twice a day for 10 minutes water is pouring from sprinklers on top. sprinklers are directed into the felt But there is a bit of water flowing on the outer part of the felt.

    if you think there's not enough water I will add mist nozzles directed towards the roots . So they can be rinsed once or twice a day for a few minutes with reverse osmosis water.
    I will also make some shade, Because now it would be difficult to move the plant.

    Ivy and some other fast-growing plants were a mistake. I planted them to cover quickly the felt, but now it's very hard to get rid of them.


    Thank you once again :)

    Best,
    Wojtek
     
  4. Ray

    Ray Orchid Iconoclast Supporting Member

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    Thank you for the clarification on the culture.

    Have you checked the quality and extent of the root system. The wrinkles in the leaves suggest that the loss & use of water is greater than the amount absorbed. That can be due to under-watering or a lack of means of absorbing it. As it looked like they were in soil, I assumed the latter.

    What are you feeding them? At what concentration and how often?

    I grow several of my plants in a passive hydroponic method, and the water contains 25 ppm N. For the particular fertilizer formula I use, the true TDS (mg fertilizer per kg solution) is about 185 ppm.

    Also, be wary about trusting the readings of the TDS meter.