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Virus Passed through pollen, seed?

Discussion in 'Issues, Disease and Pests' started by dahiker, Dec 3, 2008.

  1. dahiker

    dahiker Member

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    Location:
    western Washington State
    Anyone know?
    Are viruses passed through pollen or seed?
    I have a plant C. loddigesii coer. 'Blue Sky' Am/Aos x C. amethystoglossa coer. (also awarded/don't remember initials)
    I think it has a virus. Flowers are really nice.
    Keeping it simple, Can I save pollen? How's this done?
    Can I self it and have virus-free children? How's this done?

    Thanks loads,

    dahiker
     
  2. Tom_in_PA

    Tom_in_PA I am not an addict

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    First welcome dahiker

    I am not an expert but I remember reading somewhere if you use dry seed it will not carry the virus over to offspring. As far a saving pollen they I also remember reading you can save it in a fridge with some desicate to keep it dry.

    Someone please correct me if i am wrong
     
  3. Candace

    Candace Kept Woman Supporting Member

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    Have it tested at Critter Creek Labs to know for sure. Then you won't have to fret about it. I've also heard the dry seed method is good for ensuring the virus isn't transmitted. But, you don't want to use the pollen from a virused plant as I understand. Use it only as the mother plant.
     
  4. Jon

    Jon Mmmm... bulbophyllum...

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    Using pollen from an infected plant has the potential to infect the capsule parent. Not sure that answers any of your questions, but it's a consideration.

    Storing pollen is generally pretty easy. I use a needle, pluck the pollen, push the other end of the needle into something soft, and contain it in a vessel that maintains ~30% RH. The easiest way to maintain 30% RH is to use a calcium chloride and water mix. I mix enough CaCl2 in a water solution to make a slurry. Then put it all in the fridge. At about 40f, RH stays pretty close to 30%. I learned that from Aaron Hicks' Asymbiotic Technique of Orchid Seed Germination. Killer book if anyone is interested in flasking.

    I think Forrest still has my copy...
     
  5. dahiker

    dahiker Member

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    Location:
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    It sounds like I can't use the pollen, therefor can't safely self pollinate the plant. Have to get some pollen from a likely cross to put in the flower.
    The 'putting in the flower' bit: can anyone describe?

    Thanks for answers!

    Dan/dahiker
     
  6. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    If the plant is already virused, self-pollinating it won't make a difference. You can take pollen from a virus free plant and use that to pollinate a virused plant. You just don't want to take pollen from a virused plant and place that on a clean plant as that can transfer the virus.

    If you wait for the capsule to split naturally (don't cut the end to hasten it) and collect the seed, it should be fine. As I understand it, the seed isn't virused, but the capsule is so you don't want to get any fluid from the capsule on the seed. Also, dry seed is sterilized before sowing (green pod seed isn't) so that is an added protection.