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Water tests

Discussion in 'Issues, Disease and Pests' started by Forrest, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. Forrest

    Forrest Really Neat

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    oh man. you are going to put me to work aren't you?

    /me kicks himself for not negotiating the full terms of the deal prior to agreeing.
     
  2. Aceetobe

    Aceetobe Member

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    You're not going to get 25,000 gallons, but you can do enough for orchids.

    1 inch of rain on 1000 sq ft of roof = 600 gallons. Even in San Diego, I could do 2,000 gallons a year easily if I wanted.

    I'm rigging up a system thats pretty cheap, modular, and hidden. I'll post a link when I find it, but in essence I've rigged up a series of interconnected 55 gallon barrels that collect the diversion from my gutters. My test run is 4 55 gallon barrels, they aren't leaking so I'm moving up to 14 or so next year. Mine are currently on the north side of my shade structure/GH. I could also place the barrels underneath my benches.

    Mixed 50/50 with city water gives me 250 ppm, and will be almost enough for the whole year.
     
  3. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    That is the amount for my orchids! I can use city water for everything else.


    I can get 25,000 gallons, I just can't do the storage tank.
     
  4. Jon

    Jon Mmmm... bulbophyllum...

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    It's illegal in Colorado to trap rain water. It's considered theft, and people were getting taken to court during our last drought because of it.
     
  5. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze Anglican Supporting Member

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    Y'all should be like the redwoods and harvest the fog! I bet you could erect some type of tree shaped structure (or a field of them) that would funnel the dripping fog into some kind of collection system. Do you get fog in San Diego? Santa Barbara? I dont' know how far south the fog comes in daily but ...maybe Marni can bottle it and send it southwards.

    I currently have five plastic trashcans on my porch that are full of rain and icemelt. We're due for some rain in a few days and I'm already planning for how to grab some more or 'upgrade' what I've already saved. Around here, when it rains it pours, but when it doesn't rain...it REALLY doesn't rain. I think we've had a half inch since last September. :(
     
  6. Clark

    Clark Gator Member

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    Jon, can you guys steal ice?
     
  7. Tom_in_PA

    Tom_in_PA I am not an addict

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    That is interesting Jon I never knew that.

    My collection is small compared to most here (I don't really count but I am guessing only 300+ plants) so I collect rain in a 55 gallon barrel and move it into containers I store in the basement for the winter (otherwise it is one large ice cube!).

    I saw an episode of "This Old House" where they put in a rain water collection system (in TX I think?) where it didn't rain much but the tank was huge and buried in the ground!
     
  8. Aceetobe

    Aceetobe Member

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    I knew your collection was large, but not that epically gigantic :poke:. How many thousands of plants? What is your irrigation/watering system currently like?

    You need to ditch all the Pleuros and Bulbos and start growing some Eulophias or something. :evil:

    Well for the rest of us, rain water collection is a viable alternative for collections where you use 5-10 gallons per day on water.
     
  9. Jon

    Jon Mmmm... bulbophyllum...

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    People downstream of my house own the water that falls from the sky over my house.
     
  10. Bob2741

    Bob2741 New Member

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    I have 300 Gallon Poly-tank that catches rain water but that dosent made it through July/Aug/Sept our dry months so I recently had a GE Merlin RO system given to me by a friend that couldn't use it. It can make about 700 gallons of RO water, in 24 hr
    It does have waste but I measured it in a 5 gallon bucket and it took about 6 1/2 min to fill. I have piped the waste to my fish pond which during the summer I have to top off regulary. I'll use rain water until I run Out then switch to RO for the 3 dry months Ro system Pictured
    ro1.jpg
     
  11. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Perhaps I have very few plants, but am just a VERY heavy waterer? :poke:

    Truthfully, I have no idea how many plants I have, but I do hand water every single one of them. A friend recently said perhaps 5000. I do know I have way too many and am still actively looking for more.

    I have approx 1000 sq ft of greenhouse space total. For water storage I use what is (disparagingly) called a "tank farm". I currently have 9 50-55 gallon drums connected by syphon tubes or with through-bulkhead fittings at ground level (those were my first 4 barrels and not a great idea). I used to just have the 4, but over time I've had to add more as the collection grew. My RO system has 3 75 gallon per day membranes that work on regular water pressure. In the summer it just keeps up with my needs of 200 gallons per day average.

    Even though I put this in 10 years ago, I am still proud of the fact that I did the whole thing myself (except for digging a trench) and wasn't reduced to tears once. Another plumbing victory.

    I'm not considering a Eulophia collection, but I could have a very large collection of Oncidium onustum and really slash my water needs.
     
  12. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Bob, nice system. 700 gallons a day!!!
     
  13. Bob2741

    Bob2741 New Member

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    Performance Data & Specifications:
    GE's Performance Specifications MIN MAX AVERAGE
    Permeate Flow Rate 0.33GPM - 1.25 Lt/Min 0.75GPM - 2.84 Lt/Min 0.50GPM - 1.89 Lt/Min
    TDS Rejection (NaCl) 90% 99% 93%
    Production (lt/day) 1,800 lt/day 4,100 lt/day 2,800 lt/day
    Production (GPD) 480.00 GPD 1,080 GPD 750 GPD
    Outline Dimensions: L x W x H
    CENTIMETERS 51.7 x 24.6 x 43.3
    INCHES 20.34 x 9.68 x 17.05
    FILTER TYPE DIMENSIONS INCHES (cm) FLOW RATE AVERAGE LIFE **
    LENGTH DIAMETER GPM LT/MIN USG LT TIME
    CARBON PREFILTER 17.0 " (43.2) 2.9" (7.4) 3.75 14.2 5.000 18.925 6 MONTHS
    RO ELEMENT (x2) 18.75" (4.76) 3.16" (8.0) 0.25 0.95 --- --- 2-4 YEARS
    CARBON POSTFILTER 10.5" (26.7) 2.6 (6.6) 0.75 2.8 --- --- 6 MONTHS
     
  14. Jon

    Jon Mmmm... bulbophyllum...

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    700 gallons a day is a killer system. Mine is a simple ol' 100GPD, and it doesn't keep up. I think it's either clogged or the cold water seriously hinders the performance. Our tap water in the winter is around 45f.
     
  15. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Jon, colder water will slow down production, but not a whole lot in my experience. When my production goes down, it is frequently because my prefilters are clogged. As my needs increased, I did add more RO membranes to the system and that helped. I may add more. I am filtering for sodium and am told that it is very easy on the membrane. Other things are more problematic and require replacing more often and/or acid washing. I've also been told that the lower the rate of discharge water, the fast the membranes go bad. But you may already know all this.
     
  16. Jon

    Jon Mmmm... bulbophyllum...

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    My post-filter, pre-membrane pressure is 90PSI.
     
  17. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    That rules out that problem.
     
  18. Jon

    Jon Mmmm... bulbophyllum...

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    Maybe I need to replace the membrane. ¡cha-ching!
     
  19. Tracey

    Tracey Interloper

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    Seriously? At the height of the drought here, the Govt were paying people subsidies to install rainwater tanks. I've never not had one, and never will.
     
  20. Jon

    Jon Mmmm... bulbophyllum...

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    Yup. Every drop of water that falls from the sky is owned by someone downstream. Our municipal supply owns a certain number of acre feet of snowmelt that occurs 50+ miles from here. Water rights are separable from real property rights, and old homesteads sold them separately for more money. Farmers have bought and sold water rights here for over a century. Water court is a BIG deal here.

    Ok... so back from the hijack... Forrest... you're screwed if they implement restrictions.