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Zootrophion hirtzii (with 3/7/2018 update)

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by KellyW, Dec 28, 2017.

  1. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Grown intermediate-warm, shade, daily summer water, mounted on cork with a sphagnum pad.

    This is supposed to be a spring bloomer (according to IOSPE) o_O. It did bloom in April also but with one flower. There are a few more tiny buds on the plant.

    Zootrophion hirtzii close RAW-900.jpg Zootrophion hirtzii plant-900.jpg
     
  2. pcolman

    pcolman Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Your plant looks very good. The flowers blooming near each other is nice as well.
     
  3. Kipper

    Kipper CoffeeCoffeeCoffee... Supporting Member

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    Great plant Kelly! :clap: I thought these had to be kept cool...
     
  4. weeand

    weeand Well-Known Member

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    Very beautiful grown plant. Love those flowers.
    Thought it was a more intermediate-cool grower.
     
  5. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    In my case, ignorance was bliss. I was given a small division of this plant a few years ago. The plant has grown very well and has flowered a few times. I didn't realize until recently that it was supposed to be a cool grower. I guess it is forgiving of temperatures.

    I also have a small Z. serpentinum. It has grown much slower but I noticed yesterday that it has a bloom bud forming.
     
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  6. Mikhail kujawa

    Mikhail kujawa Well-Known Member

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    Love this plant! Thank you for sharing.
     
  7. Raven

    Raven Well-Known Member

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    Nice! Always wanted to grow Zootrophions - might be a good species to start with!
     
  8. Chuck-NH

    Chuck-NH Well-Known Member

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    Orchids are amazing! In a prior forum I commented how I grow and bloom Epidendrum longicaule well, yet not by the formula that brings success to others. In the case of Zootrophion hirtzii, I grow it in the coolest corner of the greenhouse and it grows like crazy, but has not bloomed since I've had it. It is literally big enough to wear as a shoulder length wig. I think I'll cut it up and put pieces in various locations until I find the happy place.
     
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  9. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I have done that with other species (Dendrobium tetragonum var giganteum; Trichosalpinx chamaelepanthes come to mind).
     
  10. weeand

    weeand Well-Known Member

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    Beautiful how to see how adaptable some species are.
    Someone told me once that the cool growing species have a better adaptation towards warmer temps than visa versa.
    Could this be true?
     
  11. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I don't know about warm growers adapting to cool conditions but in my conditions (intermediate to warm) very few cool growing plants thrive. Some cool growers do well and are obviously adaptable but, for me, most cool growers fail to flower and eventually die. I have never kept a Dracula alive for more than about a year. I have a few Masdevallia that do OK but I don't buy them anymore because most fail. I can't keep Dendrobium cuthbertsonii alive.
     
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  12. weeand

    weeand Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the reply, Kelly. :)
    So much for what I heard about this topic.o_O
     
  13. Raven

    Raven Well-Known Member

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    Kelly,
    Can you please name a couple of cool growers that have adapted extremely well to your conditions? I would expect most of them being Dendrobiums, but are there plants from other genera?
     
  14. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Raven, I am very careful now what plants I buy so they fit in well with my temperature conditions. However, here are a few that I can think of that are cool-cold growers that have been doing well for me. There are probably a few others that will come to mind later.......

    Pleurothallis alvaroi (pink)
    Pleurothallis prolifera
    Dendrobium limpidum
    Coelogyne nitida
    Maxillaria marginata

    If I think of more I'll update the thread.

    I would be interested to hear how others are doing with these species and also about other cool-cold growers that are thriving (and blooming) in intermediate + conditions.
     
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  15. Raven

    Raven Well-Known Member

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    Kelly,
    This is really cool! I'm not really surprised about Coelogyne nitida and Pleurothallis prolifera, but I would've never guessed that Pleurothallis alvaroi and Maxillaria marginata (both come from above 2000 meters altitude) can be grown that warm. I wonder if there are clones of D. cuthbertsonii from lower altitudes that can be grown intermediate...
    Would definitely be really nice to see what other people managed to grow!
     
  16. Chuck-NH

    Chuck-NH Well-Known Member

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    Hi Kelly,

    I took a picture today of my plant and I actually found a bud! I'm thinking it might need a little more light.
    image.jpeg image.jpeg
     
  17. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Beautiful plant, Chuck.
    The more I look at my plant the more buds I find. The little buds are hard to see down in the foliage.
     
  18. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I just wanted to do a follow-up on a comment I made above in post #5.

    I said:

    The Z. serpentinum continued to make several buds but every one blasted. The serpentium is growing in the same conditions as the hirtzii (literally side-by-side) which makes me think the serpentium requires cooler conditions. The hirtzii continued to produce additional flowers lower on the plant.
     
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